Why can’t we get past the “tragedy of the commons”?

Last year I postponed a rant about the ill-named “the tragedy of the commons” concept.  I can contain myself no longer. Since Garrett Hardin published his influential 1968 paper of that name, decades of scholarship has shown that he got it wrong.  In the right...

Asking ourselves questions about race, environmentalism and inspiration

Regular readers of the Deliberative Landscapes Wanderer may see in this post a deviation from the topics I normally cover.  The turmoil unfolding in the United States of America right now seems to have captured the attention of the whole world, including me, and the...

It’s not always a collective action problem

Commons thinking has had a profound influence on how we understand sustainability, land rights, and natural resource management.  This school of thought traces its origins most notably to Nobel laureate Elinor Ostrom and believes that under the right circumstances...

Disconnect, Reconnect Differently: Pandemic as Opportunity

Connectivity and resilience Are you also having a feeling of déjà vu?  The events of the past few months surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic are retelling a story that was told during the 2007-2008 financial crisis.  The characters in the story have different names, but...

What religion has to offer sustainable landscapes

The nature-religion connection Those of us working toward sustainable landscapes should be ready, in fact should actively seek out, to engage with religion.  For huge numbers of people, religion frames what life is about and for and what is important.  It guides how...